Monday, April 06, 2009

Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis

1

When Louis came home to the flat,
  he hung up his coat and his hat,
He gazed all around, but no wifey he found,
  so he said, “Where can Flossie be at?”
A note on the table he spied,
  he read it just once, then he cried.
It ran, “Louis dear, it's too slow for me here,
  so I think I will go for a ride.

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
Don't tell me the lights are shining
   any place but there ;
We will dance the Hoochee Koochee ,
   I will be your tootsie wootsie ;
If you will meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .”

2


The dresses that hung in the hall
  were gone, she had taken them all;
She took all his rings and the rest of his things;
  the picture he missed from the wall.
“What! moving!” the janitor said,
  “your rent is paid three months ahead.”
“What good is the flat?” said poor Louis, “read that.”
  And the janitor smiled as he read:

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
Don't tell me the lights are shining
   any place but there;
We will dance the Hoochee Koochee ,
   I will be your tootsie wootsie;
If you will meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .”

3


Lew Woods was the name of a horse,
  that ran at the New Orleans course,
I played him one day for a dollar each way,
  and I charged it to profit and loss;
He started to run in the wet,
  the son of a gun's running yet,
That crazy old skate, he made straight for the gate,
  and I hollered, “Hey Lew! don't forget.”

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
Take my tip and don't stop running
   until you are there;
You're a wonder that's no liesky ,
   if you don't fall down and diesky ,
Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .

4


There came to the gay tenderloin,
  a Jay who had money to burn,
The poor simple soul, showed a girlie his roll,
  and she said, “for some wine dear, I yearn.”
A bottle and bird right away,
  she touched him then said, “I can't stay.”
He sighed, “Tell me, sweet, where can you and I meet?”
  and the orchestra started to play.

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
Don't tell me the lights are shining
   any place but there ;
I'll be waiting there, my honey ,
   to divorce you from your money ,
Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .

5


The clerks in the bank said, “It's queer,
  did anyone see the cashier?
It's way after time, and we haven't a dime,
  we can't open the safe 'till he's here.”
The President shook his gray head,
  “Send out for an expert,” he said,
The door's opened wide, not a cent was inside,
  just a card, that was all, and it read:

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
All the boys and all the girls
   are going to be there ;
If they ask about the cashier ,
   you can say he cuts a dash here ,
Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .

6


In church sat a man near the door,
  asleep, he was starting to snore,
The Minister rose, and he said, “We will close
  singing, Meet on the Beautiful Shore.”
The man in the back then awoke,
  he caught the last words that he spoke;
He said, “Parson White, you can meet me alright,
  but The Beautiful Shore is a joke.”

Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair ,
Don't tell me the lights are shining
   any place but there ;
I'll be waiting at the station ,
   for the whole darned congregation ,
Meet me in St. Louis, Louis ,
   meet me at the fair .


Andrew B. Sterling


2 comments:

  1. CARSON12:06 PM

    I always remember my Grandmother singing this song.
    I had no idea that it was so sad or had so many verses.
    Thank you for sharing this one!
    Do you know anything else about it?

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  2. I had no idea all those other lyrics existed - thanks for typing all of them in! This is one of my favorite movies of all time, and I genuinely believe "Meet Me In St. Louis" is an American masterpiece. A thousand years from now, when people want to see what life was like in the midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century, they will be watching this movie. People really WERE singing this song over and over again at that time, because they were excited about the world's fair - but what most people don't know is that in 1904, St. Louis ALSO hosted the summer olympics! Imagine what an exciting time that was! Little Margaret O'Brien (Tootie) was already an acting legend when she made this movie. Stories were flying around Hollywood about her amazing skills, even as a very young girl. One story goes that, around the time she made this film (1944), she was making another film where she had to cry in one scene. Supposedly she went up to the director, and said, "Now, when I cry in this scene, do you want the tears to come all the way down, or do you want them to stop half-way?" And the luminescent Judy Garland is perfection itself - and that scene at the Christmas Ball has one of the greatest reveals in film history, plus there's a great story behind "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas," which was written for this film. I don't have time to write it now, but the point is that Judy Garland is the reason we now consider this song to be a Christmas classic. Anyway, Julie, thanks for putting all that up - very interesting!

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